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Tag conviction

Becoming the Immovable Object

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There’s a silent protest going on this morning. With a police presence of two, it’s not what you would call disruptive. But it is impactful all the same. It’s hard to ignore people of Chinese background dressed in yellow with large banners calling for the persecution of Falun Gong to end. And for the illegal trafficking of human organs to stop.

Witnessing the protest this morning reminds me of how fortunate we are to live in a country that allows us to pursue our own spiritual beliefs and way of thinking with relative freedom. Some things we take for granted. Standing there silently, allowing their presence to speak for itself, it is difficult to comprehend the persecution of people that uphold truthfulness, compassion and forbearance. But then, that’s the history of the world, isn’t it.

Watching these people, I am reminded of Mary’s take on things when things are not right. ‘Be an immoveable object’, she says. Respectful yes, but grounded and immoveable when things just have to change. From first hand experience, the power in that is quite a force to be reckoned with. I’ve seen many people back down under that energy.

Sometimes the greatest strength is not physical. You only have to look at some of our greatest leaders to see that in action.

Where can you make things better by becoming an immoveable object?

Love in action

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You may never know how far a good deed will reach…

Last week, I heard that Sir Nicholas Winton was awarded the Order of the White Lion for saving hundreds of Jewish children from almost certain death in Nazi concentration camps. Now 105 years old, his heroic actions took place so long ago, we can actually see the impact it has had. Generations of impact.

And it all began with a thought. A simple decision to take a trip to Nazi occupied Europe because he was concerned with what was happening there. He wasn’t an official, he wasn’t a peacekeeper, he wasn’t involved in Amnesty International. He was an ordinary bloke who was concerned for his fellow man, woman and child. And what he found was so disturbing to him that he decided to do what he could to help. What he did is nothing short of astounding. Because Sir Nicholas organised the rescue of 669 children, taking each of them by train to Britain and finding foster homes to care for them. I’m pretty sure most of their parents weren’t so fortunate. And he didn’t give up when the going got tough. So strong was his conviction that something must be done, he found a way forward… and he succeeded.

Time has allowed us the gift of seeing what this act of love and bravery has achieved. There are today an estimated 6000 people around the world that owe their very existence to this one man. The Czech government has honoured Sir Nicholas because he gave their children “the greatest possible gift: the chance to live and be free”.

Think you’re too small to make a difference?

Think again.

How many lives could you touch with your love in action?

 

I work on the motto that if something is not impossible,

there must be a way of doing it.

– Sir Nicholas Winton-